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A Tide of Horseshit

David Runciman: Climate Change Impasse, 24 September 2015

Why Are We Waiting? The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change 
by Nicholas Stern.
MIT, 406 pp., £19.95, May 2015, 978 0 262 02918 6
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Natural Capital: Valuing the Planet 
by Dieter Helm.
Yale, 278 pp., £20, May 2015, 978 0 300 21098 9
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Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet 
by Gernot Wagner and Martin Weitzman.
Princeton, 250 pp., £19.95, February 2015, 978 0 691 15947 8
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... could make any difference. The shale gas revolution is just the latest stage in this process. As Dieter Helm says, ‘there is enough oil, gas and coal to fry the planet many times over.’ Waiting for the oil to run dry is like waiting for new information to run dry so the book can finally get written: it’s not going to happen. Still, the situation ...

How can we live with it?

Thomas Jones: How to Survive Climate Change, 23 May 2013

The Carbon Crunch: How We’re Getting Climate Change Wrong – and How to Fix It 
by Dieter Helm.
Yale, 273 pp., £20, September 2012, 978 0 300 18659 8
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Earthmasters: The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering 
by Clive Hamilton.
Yale, 247 pp., £20, February 2013, 978 0 300 18667 3
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The City and the Coming Climate: Climate Change in the Places We Live 
by Brian Stone.
Cambridge, 187 pp., £19.99, July 2012, 978 1 107 60258 8
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... apparent successes of the first commitment period turn out to be not only modest but illusory: as Dieter Helm points out in The Carbon Crunch, Western Europe’s 10 per cent reduction in emissions since 1990 is largely attributable to a decline in manufacturing. A lot of the energy generated in China’s coal-fired power stations, which burn ...

When the Floods Came

James Meek: England’s Water, 31 July 2008

... 1980s, not with what they might, or should, have been. In January this year, the Oxford economist Dieter Helm published a hair-raising analysis of the regulation of Britain’s privatised utilities which ought to have shocked the nation and, if its dense technical vocabulary had been more comprehensible to MPs and non-economists, probably would ...
... shareholder a fiver for every share they owned in order to prevent the takeover. The economist Dieter Helm, in his book Energy, the State and the Market, writes: ‘Northern Electric in effect revealed that it could have given its domestic customers a year without paying any bills and still have been able to finance its functions.’ The privatised ...

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