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Che pasticcio!

Tim Parks: Carlo EmilioGadda, 20 September 2007

That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana 
by Carlo EmilioGadda, translated by William Weaver.
NYRB, 388 pp., £8.99, February 2007, 978 1 59017 222 3
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... eighty years (1893-1973) and many publications, an air of incompletion lingers about the work of Carlo EmilioGadda. His most popular novel, That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, is an unfinished murder story. His best work, Acquainted with Grief, is again unfinished and again leaves us with an unsolved crime ...

Calvinoism

Jonathan Coe, 26 March 1992

Six Memos for the Next Millennium 
by Italo Calvino, translated by Patrick Creagh.
Cape, 124 pp., £5.99, February 1992, 0 224 03311 5
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Under the Jaguar Sun 
by Italo Calvino, translated by William Weaver.
Cape, 86 pp., £10.99, February 1992, 0 224 03310 7
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The Fountains of Neptune 
by Rikki Ducornet.
Dalkey Archive, 220 pp., $19.95, February 1992, 0 916583 96 1
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Small Times 
by Russell Celyn Jones.
Viking, 212 pp., £14.99, February 1992, 0 670 84307 5
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... of the encyclopedic novel through Perec, Mann, Proust and Flaubert, he homes in on the figures of Carlo EmilioGadda and Robert Musil, two ‘engineer-writers’ who have one quality in common: ‘their inability to find an ending’. Despite his own love of arcana and encyclopedic forms, Calvino’s relationship to ...

How should they remember it?

John Foot: War in the Alps, 9 April 2009

The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front 1915-19 
by Mark Thompson.
Faber, 455 pp., £9.99, April 2009, 978 0 571 22334 3
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... Hemingway in A Farewell to Arms, where he wrote that ‘war is not won by victory.’ The writer Carlo EmilioGadda, who took part in the chaotic retreat and was imprisoned for months by the Austrians, wrote at the time that ‘my moral life is over’ and later said: ‘The shame of the defeat became increasingly ...

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